Sunday, March 3, 2024
ReviewTelevision

The Bad Batch season two episode 7 and 8 review

By Kieran Burt.

Star Wars: The Bad Batch can be a difficult show. Sometimes, there will be episodes that are amazing, such as episode three ‘The Solitary Clone’ or episode 15 in season one, but other times they can have a staggering drop in quality, like episode five ‘Entombed’ or episode 13 in season one. 

Thankfully, both episodes seven and eight are on the higher end of this scale. These feel similar to the political intrigue present in Andor, with both featuring a window into the function of the early Imperial Senate. The Defence Recruitment Bill is on the floor, and Senator Chuchi, a returning face from Star Wars: The Clone Wars, is determined to stop it.  

The Bad Batch takes a backseat in episode seven, as the stakes are set for the arc. A clone decides that he will tell the truth about Kamino to the Imperial Senate, something that will damage Vice Admiral Rampart and his Defence Recruitment Bill he is trying to push through. What ensues is a tense game of cloak and dagger, with Rampart trying to cover his actions without drawing even more attention to himself.  

A great small detail about this Imperial Coruscant is that Ventators can be seen all across the skyline, signifying Imperial control. Palpatine not being present in Senate meetings unless he has to be is also a nice touch, helping further to connect this episode to Andor. It also shows the stark transition the Imperial Senate undergoes between now and then.  

What the Bill contains is something that is unfortunately glossed over. The characters repeatedly say it will create a new military, but a military is more than just men. They need walkers, weapons, starfighters and new capital ships, something that audiences know the Empire invests heavily into. 

The episode misses a chance to explain this, even briefly, and include a shout out to a critical location in Star Wars that doesn’t get its due, the Kuat Drive Yards, a key shipyard for both the Republic and Empire. 

Episode eight sees the Bad Batch enter the fray, tasked with stealing information from a Venator. This stealth adventure was fun, and their escape when it inevitably goes wrong was creative. They are successful in their mission, which is surprising given some of the past episodes. 

Omega goes with Senator Chuchi to have a crash course in politics, teaching her what should happen in the chamber, and meets up with another familiar face, Senator Halle Burtoni. This whole section is very reminiscent of an episode of The Clone Wars, where Padme teaches Ahsoka about politics. Burtoni is just as audiences remember her, cold and uncaring. But Omega reaches her humanity,a gift she has displayed multiple times. It’s a touching moment.  

Palpatine’s appearance in this episode is haunting, with the music portraying him as a supernatural being.Throughout the episode, the music takes a darker turn too, adding to the tense feeling. He immediately commands everyone’s attention, from the audience, to Rampart snapping to attention, and silence to the senators. He then expertly twists the truth to his advantage, teaching Omega a lesson in politics that Chuchi never could. The truth isn’t enough to sway people, but how you frame that truth. 

Both episodes have some deeply rooted political inspirations and themes, from manipulative politicians, veterans not getting their due, and the problem of the military industrial complex, all things that are real issues. Star Wars handles these issues well, never feeling preachy but still calling attention to them.

As if this bombshell wasn’t enough, the episode has one more. The Batch feel responsible about ushering the age of the stormtrooper, and start to leave Coruscant. But Echo refuses to leave. He instead stays with Rex, saying his purpose is to help the clones. 

This surprise does make sense for his character, he’s always felt more attached to helping the clones and standing up to the Empire. Hopefully the show doesn’t forget about him though, as it seems to have done so about Crosshair. 

Both episodes have some deeply rooted political inspirations and themes, from manipulative politicians, veterans not getting their due, and the problem of the military industrial complex, all things that are real issues. Star Wars handles these issues well, never feeling preachy but still calling attention to them.
These two episodes have been the best of the season so far, with a feel of a political thriller, appropriate cameos from The Clone Wars and amazing soundtrack that heightens every moment. Seeing Coruscant is always a joy, and these two episodes appropriately made it feel dark. This felt like a natural continuation of the Senate based episodes of The Clone Wars, living up to the legacy of the show.

Kieran Burt

My name is Kieran and I am based in the UK. I love writing about all things science fiction and fantasy, particularly Star Wars and Marvel. When I’m not writing or watching anything sci-fi related, you can probably find me exploring the open worlds of alternate lands through my Xbox.

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